Coronavirus COVID-19 Food News Uncategorized

Photo Gallery: Coastal Bend Food Bank Makes Strides in Wake of COVID-19

CORPUS CHRISTI, TX— The Coastal Bend Food Bank and food pantries across the Coastal Bend have made major strides to provide food for struggling families since the outbreak of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) began.

As people continue to horde supplies and panic purchase food items, the amount of food available to these citizens has declined significantly. Staples such as water, toilet paper, bread, eggs, meat and milk are flying off the shelves faster than grocery stores can restock. Coupled with businesses shutting down leaving many out of work, this has left many families, especially low-income families, wondering how they are going to find their next meal. The Coastal Bend Food Bank has been providing food for the people of the Coastal Bend since its formation in 1982. By collecting food that would have otherwise been discarded by wholesalers, retailers and manufacturers, the Coastal Bend Food Bank has allowed the opportunity for this food to land in the hands of needing individuals struggling with food insecurity.  The food begins at their distribution center located in the northside of Corpus Christi and is distributed to more than 144 agency partners in 11 different counties across South Texas where they can be collected. Since the outbreak of COVID-19, the food bank has been working in overdrive, delivering more frequently to food pantries and holding more drive-thru distributions than usual.

As of March 28, Nueces county has 21 confirmed cases of the virus, and as time persists, the number is only expected to rise. On March 25, Nueces County Judge Barbara Canales issued a stay-at-home order which is set to last for the next two weeks. This has only created a much larger incentive to provide food for the low-income families now being advised to not leave their homes. The Coastal Bend Food bank says they have been monitoring the situation carefully and want to ensure the community that they are ready to serve them with a full staff.   

Corpus Christi HEB at the intersection of Weber and Holly has an empty aisle of toliet paper and napkins.
Workers of the Coastal Bend Food Bank pack boxes of non-perishable items admist citywide food shortages due to the Coronavirus pandemic.
Workers of the Coastal Bend Food Bank pack boxes of non-perishable items admist citywide food shortages due to the Coronavirus pandemic.
Signs of the Coastal Bend Food Bank’s vision and mission in the warehouse.
Coastal Bend Food Bank development coordinator Robert Morales, 49, prepares non-pershiable items before placing them into boxes.
Workers of the Coastal Bend Food Bank pack items like peanut butter, Ramen Noodles and box macaroni and cheese into boxes before sending them out to needing citizens.
Employees and volunteers of the Coastal Bend Food Bank work to provide food for the people of the Coastal Bend area amidst the Coronavirus pandemic.
Coastal Bend Food Bank logistics manager Santos Herrera, 49, plans for the next food distrubution amid the rising need for groceries due to the Coronavirus.
The food pantry at the First Christian Church in Kingsville, Texas is stocked for incoming families.
Married couple and First Christian Church members, Erich and Carol Bandelow, fill an HEB basket with food for the next family.
First Christian Church food pantry volunteer Erich Bandelow, 69, unloads food for needing Kingsville, Texas residents.
First Chirstian Church food pantry volunteer Erich Bandelow, 69, wears a face mask and gloves in light of the coronavirus outbreak.
A reading titled, “Don’t Waste Good Food” is taped on the wall in the First Christian Church food pantry in Kingsville, Texas.
First Christian Church food pantry volunteer Erich Bandelow, 69, unloads food for needing Kingsville, Texas residents.

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